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Lourdes endures all of this as she cannot afford to lose her job and while she is reluctant to prostitute herself, she will do anything in order to raise enough money for her son's surgery. Her only solace is found in her phone calls to her son in El Salvador and her interactions with Frankie Bruno Gunn , a firefighter that is the only person in New York who has shown Lourdes any true kindness. While cleaning the restaurant one night, Lourdes begins to experience strange visions where she sees strange shadowy figures that seem out to get her.

Critical reception for Devoured has been predominantly positive, and the film has received praise from multiple horror review websites. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Devoured Theatrical poster. Plus a review! Retrieved 5 September Bloody Disgusting. The story was more convoluted than necessary and I found it to be somewhat of a slog because of this. So, although I enjoyed it enough for the three star rating, I feel it could have been much better and more informative about I chose to read this book because it was presented as a mystery which is solved by the early application of forensic science.

So, although I enjoyed it enough for the three star rating, I feel it could have been much better and more informative about the beginnings of forensic science Superb Victorian mystery, encompassing scientific and evolutionary expeditions in Borneo, the glamorous mansions of dukes and the muck and gloom of London's poorest streets. Devoured is an exciting and intelligent thriller which weaves together a thread of trails in an atmospheric and riveting manner.

Gory and polished, this is a thoroughly enjoyable thriller and mystery, set at a time when forensics were in their infancy and science was undoing beliefs. Plus lots of twists which I didn't guess. Apr 25, Amy rated it it was ok Shelves: owned-books. This is a book with a great premise and backbone but was let down by lack of description and character development.

I felt nothing for any of the characters and was so confused by the end of the novel. A lack of description made the story drag and I was so bored trudging through each chapter. As a novel intended to encapsulate the Victorian world, the world of budding forensic science this novel had so much potential but failed to deliver. Sep 01, Graham Crawford rated it did not like it. This is pretty superficial stuff. Occasionally slightly interesting but not enough research or period detail to sink your teeth into.

It has really stupid plot.


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This book is supposed to be about the first forensic investigations in the Victorian London- But the characters "solve" the murder by non-forensic means. The structure and the point become null and void. Really don't bother reading this - The writer is a bit stupid and the publishers more so for letting this slip through into print.

I did really enjoy this. OK so it wasn't exactly a 'whodunnit' although there were enough loose ends to keep you interested to the end and characterisation was a little sketchy - I still have only the vaguest mental picture of the two forensic experts who are the heroes of this series - but it was a good read for a long coach journey back from London and it was an entertaining - if gory - 24 hours of escapism. Apr 02, AA Palliser rated it it was amazing. I loved this book.

Dense with characters, meaty, interesting. The forensic detail from it's inception was really great and I found myself having to slow down or I would miss detail! A great who done it, and really for readers whom enjoy the complex and rich stories with a flavour of Doyle.

I look forward to this authors next outing!! Oct 02, Erin Britton added it. In the least fashionable and thus least socially acceptable area of medicine in which to practice was forensics. Being a surgeon rather than a decent, respectable doctor was considered bad enough but pursuing a living that involves dissecting folk was just beyond the pale. In addition to the social stigma, those few brave men of science willing to devote themselves to forensics also had to overcome the problem of funding their research.

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The gentlemen scientists of the Victorian era had to r In the least fashionable and thus least socially acceptable area of medicine in which to practice was forensics. The gentlemen scientists of the Victorian era had to rely on wealthy patrons to sponsor their work and, unsurprisingly given the mood at the time, forensic specialists did not enjoy an abundance of generosity.

It is this difficulty in funding the development of their science that leads Professor Adolphus Hatton and his morgue assistant Albert Roumande to assist the police with their investigations in the hope of securing a nice annual stipend from the local constabulary. While Lady Bessingham might have courted controversy with some of her intellectual pursuits and her patronage of certain adventuring scientists and rare specimen collectors, there appears no reason for her murder.

Employing their cutting edge forensic techniques no smoking near the corpse, sniffing said corpse for peculiar odours, making use of cutting-edge [ha! Devoured is an intriguing historical murder mystery. Meredith has clearly done a great deal of research, both into the Victorian period in general and into the early days and development of forensic science in particular. The level of detail that she provides gives the novel a real air of authenticity and the period tone is maintained throughout the entire story.

While authors are often good at recreating the place and material circumstances that provide the setting for historical fiction, recreating the speech patterns and dialogue choices of the time is often far harder. The mystery surrounding the death of Lady Bessingham is perhaps a little slow to get going as there is quite a bit of scene setting and basic character building at the beginning of the book.

However, this slow build-up really helps to establish the period setting and to introduce Hatton and Roumande as deep, sympathetic characters. Devoured is a great beginning to what could potentially be an excellent historical mystery series. Dec 29, Rosie rated it liked it Shelves: adult , mystery , murder , friendship , london , detective , pornography , anthropology , forensics , human-trafficking.

I found this in the donation bin at my library and grabbed it thinking it would be an interesting read.

Despite the super intriguing murder mystery it felt very heavy handed and lackluster. The conflict between science v. I liked it enough to qualify it as a "Beach Read" and if I stumbled upon the sequel I would pic I found this in the donation bin at my library and grabbed it thinking it would be an interesting read. I liked it enough to qualify it as a "Beach Read" and if I stumbled upon the sequel I would pick it up but I wasn't super invested. I was hoping for more focus on forensic scientist buddy-buddy team between the two main protagonists as they seemed to be the most interested of the two characters.

The rest were uninteresting. Mar 30, Sue rated it liked it. I really enjoyed this read not for the faint hearted with some of the more gruesome descriptions but I found it fascinating. It involves Hatton and roumande who become involved in a crime scene of the glamorous lady bessingham who has a vast collection of fossil and there new world of forensics is called in to help. There are lots of avenues to explore with the story I liked the letters that were written to lady bessingham opening up the new way the world was beginning to see science but you als I really enjoyed this read not for the faint hearted with some of the more gruesome descriptions but I found it fascinating.

There are lots of avenues to explore with the story I liked the letters that were written to lady bessingham opening up the new way the world was beginning to see science but you also had the world back in the backstreets of London too. It envoked Victorian England wonderfully and I look forward to reading about this new duo again.

Started off slow, and not very well written. Got better past midway when the murders became more fascinating and more difficult to link together. Although the writing style was not great, praise has to be given for an original plot and for not writing a murder mystery that was obvious and trite. The book really came into its own in descriptions of travel, murder and Victorian London.

Characters are rather forgettable, but feel human, even if the descriptions of them are forced. Read it for its p Started off slow, and not very well written. Read it for its plot, and try to keep going past the midway point because it does get better once the writer stops describing the bloody snow every 4 paragraphs. Mar 28, Luce Cronin rated it liked it Shelves: crime-fiction.

As a novel, this book does give you a good look at British Victorian society, its social mores as well as ways of thinking. The author writes well; there are not many descriptive passages, but one still gets a good mental picture of London as it was, with its extreme poverty in some classes contrasted with the often entitled privileged behaviour of the the so-called upper classes.

This also gives you a good introduction to the fad of that period - the obsession with the natural world, collecting As a novel, this book does give you a good look at British Victorian society, its social mores as well as ways of thinking. This also gives you a good introduction to the fad of that period - the obsession with the natural world, collecting plants, insects, animal specimens and the underlying brutality of that fad. The reader will also get a look at the societal upset caused by Darwin and Lyell, theories taken for granted today.

Jun 10, Soozee rated it did not like it. Its rare I don't finish a book, but half way through this one I decided it just wasn't interesting and life's too short to plough on with books you're not enjoying. Its like the author wanted to write about the rise of forensic science, and was shoehorning a fictional story into the idea. It was lecturing, it was boring, it was muddled. I didn't identify with any of the characters, nor could I care less about them. Not for me. Apr 02, Cecilia Rodriguez rated it it was ok. The story is set in London and involves the British "boom" in exploration and sample collecting.

The story also addresses the darker topics of Human Trafficking and Pedophilia. Unlike other mysteries that explore the early history of forensics, Meredith spent very little time explaining Adolpus Hatton's Technics or practices. Jun 16, S. I am of a strange, divided opinion about the Victorian world. As a historian it bothers me, since it is almost too current and understandable to class as history in my mind, and the fact that it feels too recent often steers me away from it.

I find Sherlock Holmes to be a little awkward and badly-tied together in literature and often too gung ho or arty in cinema with perhaps the exception of some recent re-imaginings. But reg I am of a strange, divided opinion about the Victorian world. But regardless, there is something about Holmes that speaks to the mystery lover within. Victorian literature generally leaves me cold. Dickens produced some nice pieces, but I was schooled on the like of Thomas Hardy and frankly I would rather read a Shanghai phonebook.

Then look him up ; the Eilean Mor lighthouse same again. I gather people find my own protagonists portrayed in a similar way, so I will certainly choose to see it as a strength! Devoured hooked me in three ways. The writing I am, and have always been, a huge fan of the period horror tales of H. They also reminded me a little of the Dracula story-telling style of Stoker. It would have been enough to hook me on its own. But those sections are interspersed with current investigation that keeps all the flavour and style of Victorian London and yet presents it in a form most accessible for a modern reader.

That alone is a triumph. At no point did I ever tire of reading Devoured. The plot Kept me guessing right to the end. A mystery rarely does that for anyone, not just me. Roughly every 50 pages through I would put Devoured down, review what I knew, and try to deduce what had truly happened. I was never right. The whole plot is not so much a complex spider web, with a vicious spider at the centre and half a dozen dead flies, as an old sash window, home to two or three overlapping cobwebs, several spiders of varying unpleasantness, and a host of slightly worrying crane flies, dead wasps and so on.

The plot of Devoured is complex and a well-crafted thing of chilling beauty. I challenge all comers to mail me with a solution before you are within 60 pages of the end!

The atmosphere Devoured pulls out all the chilling Victorian winter atmosphere of any Dickens, Holmes, Ripper, Lovecraft tale and then some. There are moments when I had to lower the book and exhale deeply after something was just so chillingly described that it made me pause. Equally, there are moments that made me chuckle with genuine affection and moments that made me wish I could truly see what Hatton was seeing. Devoured is a masterpiece. London, Victorian London is the place and the time is nineteenth century.

London, the capital of the mightiest empire on the face of the earth in ushering in the new age of science and technology. New invention and discoveries are the call of the day. One such novelty is Forensics, a new branch of science dealing with examination of cadavers and crime scenes.

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And this one of the many reasons why the elite class of London is finding it hard to accept and Our protagonist and the purveyor of this London, Victorian London is the place and the time is nineteenth century. And this one of the many reasons why the elite class of London is finding it hard to accept and Our protagonist and the purveyor of this science is Prof.

Adolphus Hatton , the chief forensic examiner at the St. Bart hospital. One fine morning Prof. Hatton and his French assistant Roumande are bewildered by the strange crimes engulfing the street of London and the bodies just keep on arriving at the morgue at the St. As the trio investigates the murder, they embark on a journey which hen Devoured , has parallel plots running at the beginning and had me stumped at times but at the end it came in together to fit into a befitting ending.

I was rather taken by surprise by the book , it is too good to be the debut novel. This book is brilliantly researched as is evident in the story. And about Prof. Hatton , he is a remarkable character , he is brilliant , astute and quite archaic Archaic to me but quite modern to the citizenry of 19 th century London. This character of Prof. Hatton shows a lot of promise and can be a remarkable one but he has a long journey to cover , a lot more to evolve to get itched in the pages of history books.

It was a brilliant read , true to the effort of the author and justifying your effort in reading this book. And the one of the most notable thing about the book is the cover design , simply superb. Hats off to the design team. Having said that I will also add that this book also had some disappointments, foremost of them was the length judging by the pace at the start of the book I felt that the story was truncated at the end.

It fell short by some fifty pages. Devoured , the debut novel of D. Feb 25, Kelly rated it it was ok. I really struggled with this book. I did not like the writing style and did not find the story very compelling. Dec 29, Cornerofmadness rated it liked it Shelves: mystery. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I like historical mysteries so I took a chance on this one and got even more excited when it looked like it would be about the Victorian battles of science and religion.

Being a biologist, I was very pleased to see names like Wallace, Darwin and Lydell being batted around. However, I'm beginning to think that having praise on book covers is a bad idea. It sets up unrealistic expectations. This was much slower and flat than I would have liked. The main investigato I like historical mysteries so I took a chance on this one and got even more excited when it looked like it would be about the Victorian battles of science and religion. The main investigators are Professor Hatton, a specialist in the fledgling science of autopsy and forensics, his French assistant, Roumande, Inspector Adams and an aristocrat, Ben Broderig.

Lady Blessingham, a pro-evolution force, has been murdered and letters sent to her from Borneo by Broderig. He wants them back because of their personal nature. During all of this there is a subplot of murdered young girls being ignored by police but not by Hatton's crew.

In some respects we need to see these different povs but the end result is we never get to know anyone in any detail so yeah, no sparkling for me. As for the purloined letters, we get to see them in detail, almost too much detail. They really drag down the entire middle of the book. However we do get to see radical evolutionary thought from Broderig, Wallace and others that the church would condemn and Broderig does things there that he wouldn't want his social circles to know. However, is this enough to kill for? Lady B is only the first. Many others with connections to her also die. Even with the draggy middle, it wasn't bad but right about mid-way, Adams starts doing things that make little sense and the ending isn't very satisfying on many levels.

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It's not a terrible book but it wasn't that great either. There seemed to be too many threads and not enough done with a few of them. I wish I could rate it higher but this book was just This is a crime mystery set in London during the s, I mean, a mystery setting in the Victorian times, who doesn't like that? That itself drew me into buying this book, plus, it was sold at a bargain price!

So, I thought I was gonna enjoy the story but no, reading the first half of it was torturing, I had a slight headache reading it at school. Everything was very confusing. In the first pages or so, I co I wish I could rate it higher but this book was just In the first pages or so, I could not understand what was happening except for that fact that some people were murdered. What made it even difficult was that I couldn't even care less about the characters, maybe it was just me, but I could not find myself to like them.

It's not that they were unlikable, to me, the characters felt like they were just there in the story to solve the murders. Now, the let's talk about the plot. As I mentioned above, I found the first half of the book confusing. From what I've seen in another review is that the first half of the story was all over the place, yes indeed, I agree.

Just because of that, I found myself still utterly confused even when reading the second half. The only thing I could gather from reading this book was that a bunch of unknown people got murdered, and that's basically the plot of the whole story. Of course, the real killer was also revealed in the end, but I didn't even care much because I just wanted to quickly finish the book.

The reason for me not liking this, maybe it's because of me being the first time reading a book set in Victorian times. I'm very much unfamiliar with western histories and the way people spoke English in the older times as I'm not a native English speaker. I may reread this in the future to see if i can completely understand the whole story and definitely will check out the next book even though I'm not a huge fan of this. Hope it'll get better! I'm a stickler for a victorian mystery and the premise of this one sounded irresistable to me.

There were times where I found the story deliciously captivating but then others where I felt a little let down. I didn't feel many of the characters were developed with any depth and therefore didn't conmnect to any of them. Roumande's character clearly had legs but everytime I started to warm to him I was whisked elsewhere.

Hatton on the otherhand wasn't particularly likeable at all - I felt as though I'm a stickler for a victorian mystery and the premise of this one sounded irresistable to me. Hatton on the otherhand wasn't particularly likeable at all - I felt as though he was meant to be a Sherlock Holmesy type but it wasn't quite pulled off. I was also a little disappointed by the ending but hey ho, you can't please everyone. Once the murderer was unveiled, it came as quite a shock that this character would perform such gruesome and ceremonial murders if his only objective was the rid the world of a certain group of people; I was expecting someone psychotic.

Hatton and Roumande seemed quite content to describe him as a 'good man' as if he had simply disposed of some vermin rather than a murderer who had taxidermied a person and pinned another to the ground